Odyssey Magazine” In the fall of 2021 the United States Department of Energy, or DoE, announced a contest to find the best ground-based optical telescope. The DoE is looking for high-quality optical telescopes that will allow scientists and explorers to discover new worlds and stars from our great oceans. Among the many competing telescopes are the European Extremely Large Telescope (EXT), which will use a ground-based infrared camera to search for planets, as well as the Widefield Spectroscopic Telescope (WST), which will use an infrared camera and infrared filter to observe distant galaxies. If you’re one of those looking for the very best technology for observing space, then the two telescopes above may be a great fit for you! Keep reading to learn more about these exciting opportunities and what you can do today to help reach our goal of discovering new worlds and stars in the next decade.

Telescopes for Viewing Planets

We all know that there are many wonderful options for high resolution telescopes. While most people have never heard of the DoE’s telescope contest, it’s a lot of fun to follow along and see what gets chosen! When designing a telescope for research purposes, you should always look for smaller instruments that will take fewer science experiments and observations to achieve the same amount of research. And in the case of a space research project, you don’t want to buy a huge machine unless it’s really going to stand up to the scrutiny of your fellow humans! It’s important for a telescope to be simple and affordable so that it can get done and finish the job in a timely manner. That means that it has to be able to work as effectively as possible, even if it’s just a small machine compared to the others on the competition.

To name a few of the best telescopes for viewing planets and galaxies in 2021, there’s the European Extremely Large Telescope (EDT), which will use an extremely large and powerful telescope to search for supernovae, black holes, galaxy mergers, and other phenomenon that astronomers want to observe. There’s also the European Southern Observatory’s (ESO’s) Very Large Telescope (Vortex observations) that will help discover new stars and galaxies. The facilities mentioned above are just a couple of the many on the chopping block waiting to be scooped up by amateur astronomers with an eye to obtaining the ultimate prize: the Nobel Prize in Physics. Please don’t miss out on your chance to explore these possibilities.

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